Sweater Vests Are Cool
cijithegeek:

youngbertreynolds:

Maybe put it on a canvas instead of someone’s property, and we can all be happy.

My father was a garment contractor in LA. In the late 80s, he owned the building where he had his factory. He thought it would be a cool idea to commission local graffiti artists, usually young Black and Latino men looking to stay out of trouble, to paint murals on his buildings. After all, he runs a garment design/manufacturing company, and creative signage is great advertising.
One day, he showed up to the building and the city just painted over the murals without permission or notice.
First, the city told him he couldn’t have graffiti art on HIS building because it brought down property value. After he complained, then they said: ok you can do this, but you need a permit. After he got the permit, then the city said: ok, but you can only use these artists.  Of course, these artists were all White graphic design students from USC, and of course they charged 3x more.
There is a prejudice against this type of art, and it’s racial.  Banksy vandalizes folks buildings all the time, and folks treat him like the Messiah. He ain’t doing nothing new that Black and Brown folks haven’t done for decades.

cijithegeek:

youngbertreynolds:

Maybe put it on a canvas instead of someone’s property, and we can all be happy.

My father was a garment contractor in LA. In the late 80s, he owned the building where he had his factory. He thought it would be a cool idea to commission local graffiti artists, usually young Black and Latino men looking to stay out of trouble, to paint murals on his buildings. After all, he runs a garment design/manufacturing company, and creative signage is great advertising.

One day, he showed up to the building and the city just painted over the murals without permission or notice.

First, the city told him he couldn’t have graffiti art on HIS building because it brought down property value. After he complained, then they said: ok you can do this, but you need a permit. After he got the permit, then the city said: ok, but you can only use these artists.  Of course, these artists were all White graphic design students from USC, and of course they charged 3x more.

There is a prejudice against this type of art, and it’s racial.  Banksy vandalizes folks buildings all the time, and folks treat him like the Messiah. He ain’t doing nothing new that Black and Brown folks haven’t done for decades.

I am finally moving to Brooklyn!

Needless to say, money is going to be tight, so if anyone wants some great art please let me know!

Other examples of my art can be found either at my art blog or in my art tag on my personal blog!

I am finally moving to Brooklyn!

Needless to say, money is going to be tight, so if anyone wants some great art please let me know!

Other examples of my art can be found either at my art blog or in my art tag on my personal blog!

archiemcphee:

These beautiful moths and butterflies look like they’re ready to flutter up and away, but they won’t be doing so because they’re wonderful textile sculptures painstakingly created by North Carolina-based artist Yumi Okita. She sews, embroiders and stitches all sorts of multi-colored fabrics to create these oversized insects, which measure nearly a foot wide. She also adds painted details along with feathers and artificial fur. With great care Okita has achieved an awesome balance between astonishing realism and fanciful invention.

Click here to view more of Yumi Okita’s gorgeous textile insect sculptures.

[via Colossal and Demilked]

tartapplesauce:

illustrate-her:

A message to you today from Artemisia Gentileschi, kick-arse 17th Century feminist artist.

Oh hell yes.  For those of you who don’t know (a) the story of Artemisia Gentileschi (b) the subject matter of her painting, let me give you a quick heads-up.
First, the topic of the picture is “Susanna and the Elders”.  It’s a story from the Book of Daniel, Old Testament, the Bible.
A beautiful young married woman, Susanna, is having a bath in her own garden.  She sends all her maids away for some privacy.  Two Elders (and these are supposed to be respectable older men, the pillars of society in both religion and secular leadership) are spying on her.  They threaten Susanna that, unless she agrees to have sex with them, they’ll spread a false story that she was meeting a young man on the sly.
Now, the point of the story is this: Susanna is a married woman.  If she’s accused of adultery, she will be sentenced to death.  The two elders know they can get away with this, because they’re respectable leaders of society and who is going to be believed: them or the woman?
Susanna refuses to be blackmailed into sex, and sure enough they carry out their threat.  Susanna is only saved when a young man named Daniel interrupts the trial, says that the two men should be questioned separately, and he cleverly picks out the flaws in their testimony to prove they are lying and she is innocent.
Now, for the artist: Artemisia Gentileschi was a 17th century Roman woman, the eldest child of a painter who, unusually, encouraged and trained his daughter to be an artist as well as his sons (and she was better than her brothers).
Her father was working with another painter whom he also hired to tutor Artemisia.  This guy raped her, but they continued to have a sexual relationship with the promise of marriage (this was because marriage was the only hope she had of keeping her reputation).  Well, being a sleazeball, he never followed through on the promise of marriage and so her father took him to court.
Artemisia also supported the charge of rape, and while maintaining her testimony that she had been a virgin before being seduced/raped, she was subjected to torture by thumbscrews - this was standard practice to make sure witnesses/plaintiffs were telling the truth, but of course, it was important that she was tortured to make sure she wasn’t lying about him because she was a jilted vindictive woman, but he wasn’t tortured to make sure he wasn’t lying about being a rapist.  Same old, same old, yes?
The point of this little history lesson?  From the second century B.C. (the setting of Susanna’s story) to the 17th century to today, men have tricked, lied, bullied and threatened women with death if they didn’t have sex with them; treated them as whores and sluts if they did have sex with them, and the whole of society was stacked in favour of the men and not the women.
It’s not “one mentally disturbed young man” that’s the problem.
It’s the whole bloody attitude of entitlement: that women exist only and mainly as sexual property for men.

tartapplesauce:

illustrate-her:

A message to you today from Artemisia Gentileschi, kick-arse 17th Century feminist artist.

Oh hell yes.  For those of you who don’t know (a) the story of Artemisia Gentileschi (b) the subject matter of her painting, let me give you a quick heads-up.

First, the topic of the picture is “Susanna and the Elders”.  It’s a story from the Book of Daniel, Old Testament, the Bible.

A beautiful young married woman, Susanna, is having a bath in her own garden.  She sends all her maids away for some privacy.  Two Elders (and these are supposed to be respectable older men, the pillars of society in both religion and secular leadership) are spying on her.  They threaten Susanna that, unless she agrees to have sex with them, they’ll spread a false story that she was meeting a young man on the sly.

Now, the point of the story is this: Susanna is a married woman.  If she’s accused of adultery, she will be sentenced to death.  The two elders know they can get away with this, because they’re respectable leaders of society and who is going to be believed: them or the woman?

Susanna refuses to be blackmailed into sex, and sure enough they carry out their threat.  Susanna is only saved when a young man named Daniel interrupts the trial, says that the two men should be questioned separately, and he cleverly picks out the flaws in their testimony to prove they are lying and she is innocent.

Now, for the artist: Artemisia Gentileschi was a 17th century Roman woman, the eldest child of a painter who, unusually, encouraged and trained his daughter to be an artist as well as his sons (and she was better than her brothers).

Her father was working with another painter whom he also hired to tutor Artemisia.  This guy raped her, but they continued to have a sexual relationship with the promise of marriage (this was because marriage was the only hope she had of keeping her reputation).  Well, being a sleazeball, he never followed through on the promise of marriage and so her father took him to court.

Artemisia also supported the charge of rape, and while maintaining her testimony that she had been a virgin before being seduced/raped, she was subjected to torture by thumbscrews - this was standard practice to make sure witnesses/plaintiffs were telling the truth, but of course, it was important that she was tortured to make sure she wasn’t lying about him because she was a jilted vindictive woman, but he wasn’t tortured to make sure he wasn’t lying about being a rapist.  Same old, same old, yes?

The point of this little history lesson?  From the second century B.C. (the setting of Susanna’s story) to the 17th century to today, men have tricked, lied, bullied and threatened women with death if they didn’t have sex with them; treated them as whores and sluts if they did have sex with them, and the whole of society was stacked in favour of the men and not the women.

It’s not “one mentally disturbed young man” that’s the problem.

It’s the whole bloody attitude of entitlement: that women exist only and mainly as sexual property for men.

artofthedarkages:

anglosaxonfragments:

mediumaevum:

Decoding Anglo-Saxon art

Rosie Weetch, curator and Craig Williams, illustrator, British Museum

Read the whole blog here: http://blog.britishmuseum.org/2014/05/28/decoding-anglo-saxon-art/

Anglo-Saxon metalworkers were like the Michelangelo of the 8th century!

"What is this, another Adventure Time ripoff?" masterpost

gingerhaze:

for those who need some reminding that dot eyes and noodle limbs and faux-naive styles aren’t a recent thing, here are some of the illustrators that I grew up with who have always inspired me.

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Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, 1943

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Quentin Blake, 1964

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Hergé, 1929

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Dr. Seuss, 1957

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Edward Gorey, 1990s

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Ludwig Bemelmans, 1942

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Jules Feiffer, 1961

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Eric von Schmidt, 1988

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William Steig, 1960s

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James Thurber, 1932

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James Stevenson, 1972

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Picasso, 1937

Feel free to add your own!

wtfarthistory:

FART HISTORY. 

For all of our previous posts on fart history, click here (and don’t forget the Japanese fart scroll we covered a while back here).

James Ensor, Les Vents, 1888, etching. Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles

Hieronymus Bosch, The Temptation of Saint Anthony, c. 1500, oil on panel. Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga, Lisbon
Hieronymus Bosch, The Temptation of Saint Anthony (copy), before 1516, oil on panel.  Musée de Beaux Arts, Brussels

Chen Wenling, What You See May Not Be Real, 2009, fiberglass and paint. Installation in Beijing Art Gallery in 2009 

Marco Zoppo, Three Putti and a Dog with Four Figures Behind from the Rosebery Album of 26 folios, c. 1455-65, pen and brown ink, brown wash on vellum.  British Museum, London (1920,0214.17.1 17 verso)

Anonymous Flemish artist, Satirical Diptych, early 16th century, oil on panel. Université de Liège

Aubrey Beardsley, Lysistrata Defending the Acropolis, 1896, illustration.  Photo courtesy of eBooks@Adelaide; The University of Adelaide Library, University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005

He-Gassen (屁合戦 Farting Battle), Edo Period (1603-1868), ink on paper.  Waseda University

Fart History: Maerten van Heemskerck, Allegory of Nature (detail), 1567, oil on panel. Norton Simon Museum, Pasadena

cristinabencina:

Some speed doodles of hyenas to get inspired. I chose this animal for the upcoming Animystics show.

cristinabencina:

Some speed doodles of hyenas to get inspired. I chose this animal for the upcoming Animystics show.

youkaiyume:

youkaiyume:

Le Dragon Noir
A parody of course of the famous "Le Chat Noir" poster by Rodolphe Salis.
Will be available as a poster at Anime Expo! You can also purchase it online in my storenvy HERE.
I’m pretty sure this has been done before… I don’t care I’m doing it anyway cuz TOOTHLESS *dies of cuteness* (watch HTTYD2. DO IT. Do it NOW.) I’m also sorry if I butchered any French (THANKS teechew for correcting me so grateful aaaah) or the Viking symbols.

NIGHT TIME REBLOG!
In case you guys missed it, I fixed the French. Also! It is now restocked again on my storenvy so get them now while they’re available! 
Visit my store

youkaiyume:

youkaiyume:

Le Dragon Noir

A parody of course of the famous "Le Chat Noir" poster by Rodolphe Salis.

Will be available as a poster at Anime Expo! You can also purchase it online in my storenvy HERE.

I’m pretty sure this has been done before… I don’t care I’m doing it anyway cuz TOOTHLESS *dies of cuteness* (watch HTTYD2. DO IT. Do it NOW.) I’m also sorry if I butchered any French (THANKS teechew for correcting me so grateful aaaah) or the Viking symbols.

NIGHT TIME REBLOG!

In case you guys missed it, I fixed the French. Also! It is now restocked again on my storenvy so get them now while they’re available! 

Visit my store

wtfarthistory:

Frans Francken the Younger, The Witches’ Kitchen, c. 1604. Private collection, on view at the Guggenheim Museum, Venice

hugonebula:

Master glassblower and stained glass artist Loren Stump in California has wowed the internet with an extraordinary display of virtuosity. He created a “loaf” of glass, called murrine, out of carefully layered glass rods that, when sliced, reveal a painstakingly detailed work of art in cross-section.

"The most impressive thing about his work is that the resulting image can only be seen in its entirety after the murrini is cut…"

(via Artist Creates Glass Loaves That Can Be Sliced Into Beautiful Portraits Like Bread | Bored Panda)

sosuperawesome:

Small and miniature oil paintings by Jessica Gardner

asylum-art:

, , , , Wim Delvoye is one of those nutty artists who literally creates everything in every medium. Literally. Sculptures, photography, installations, paintings, tattooing sedated pigs without PETA hunting for his head (from what we know), everything. Not to mention, his personal website is like SimCity meets Roller Coaster Tycoon

steffbomb:

"Goodbye, Onion Head" 👻💕
My piece for Gallery1988’s Ghostbusters 30th Anniversary show and maybe also my favorite thing I’ve ever made ever.