Sweater Vests Are Cool

medievalpoc:

redflawedglass replied to your photo: “Stephen Slaughter Portrait of Two Society Women England (c. 1740s) …”:
Sometimes it means the painting is in private hands, or (heaven forbid) no longer exists. :(

That’s true. Sometimes it’s because it’s not on display…

thebriskconvergence:

Amazing.

Lifted from:

hbcreative:

#FERGUSON

     I won’t soon forget the events that took place in #ferguson…will you?

thegestianpoet:

shellbow:

contemporaryelfinchild:

nowisthewinter:

peternyc:

Photo of a fight in the Ukranian Parliament or Renaissance painting? 

Slap them all in togas instead of suits and it would perfect

It also follows a pyramidal composition!

However, I would argue that this picture is more Baroque than Renaissance. Notable features of Baroque art are:
Images are direct, obvious, and dramatic.
Tries to draw the viewer in to participate in the scene.
Depictions feel physically and psychologically real. Emotionally intense.
Extravagant settings and ornamentation.
Dramatic use of color.
Dramatic contrasts between light and dark, light and shadow.
As opposed to Renaissance art with its clearly defined planes, with each figure placed in isolation from each other, Baroque art has continuous overlapping of figures and elements.
Common themes: grandiose visions, ecstasies and conversions, martyrdom and death, intense light, intense psychological moments.
In the baroque, artists strove to evoke aesthetic responses. Now I’m not talking about aesthetic as in “oh thats pretty” I’m talking about aesthetic like that punch in the gut reaction you get to something.
One of the ways this was done was through the depiction of intense emotion which we see in this photograph. compare to Bernini

The picture also displays a wonderful use of chiaroscuro (an effect of contrasted light and shadow created by light falling unevenly or from a particular direction on something) a style used extensively by Caravaggio and other Baroque artists.

 



I WAS THINKING THIS EARLIER AND I’M SO GLAD SOMEONE POINTED IT OUT

thegestianpoet:

shellbow:

contemporaryelfinchild:

nowisthewinter:

peternyc:

Photo of a fight in the Ukranian Parliament or Renaissance painting? 

Slap them all in togas instead of suits and it would perfect

It also follows a pyramidal composition!

However, I would argue that this picture is more Baroque than Renaissance. Notable features of Baroque art are:

  • Images are direct, obvious, and dramatic.
  • Tries to draw the viewer in to participate in the scene.
  • Depictions feel physically and psychologically real. Emotionally intense.
  • Extravagant settings and ornamentation.
  • Dramatic use of color.
  • Dramatic contrasts between light and dark, light and shadow.
  • As opposed to Renaissance art with its clearly defined planes, with each figure placed in isolation from each other, Baroque art has continuous overlapping of figures and elements.
  • Common themes: grandiose visions, ecstasies and conversions, martyrdom and death, intense light, intense psychological moments.

In the baroque, artists strove to evoke aesthetic responses. Now I’m not talking about aesthetic as in “oh thats pretty” I’m talking about aesthetic like that punch in the gut reaction you get to something.

One of the ways this was done was through the depiction of intense emotion which we see in this photograph. compare to Bernini

The picture also displays a wonderful use of chiaroscuro (an effect of contrasted light and shadow created by light falling unevenly or from a particular direction on something) a style used extensively by Caravaggio and other Baroque artists.

 

I WAS THINKING THIS EARLIER AND I’M SO GLAD SOMEONE POINTED IT OUT

karadin:

Showtime, a company that at last count had an annual revenue of almost a billion dollars, recently sent an e-mail to graphic designers asking them to enter a contest for an upcoming boxing match at the MGM Grand.

You see this all the time, create an album cover or tee shirt, etc, enter into…

hedgehog-goulash7:

preludes-and-prufrock:

awwdish:

thestraggletag:

thestraggletag:

submariet:

VAN EYCK

I lost it at the end.

Okay, I had to check out the Van Eyck thing. I was a bit in denial because, come on, every single person can’t look like President Putin!

There are no words to describe how wrong I was.

Reblogging this for my art history class this semester

buwhahaha

The art historian in me had to reblog this.

grahamyarrington:

#brooklyn #sketchbook #painting

grahamyarrington:

#brooklyn #sketchbook #painting

theotherjax:

hideakiohno:

Casual reminder that in one of Leonardo da Vinci’s many notebooks containing innumerable artistic and scientific sketches and notes of incomprehensible important, there is a sketch of two penises with legs and tails walking towards a crudely drawn anus.
The sketch was most likely done by Leonardo’s apprentice Salai, who was not only very likely one of Leonardo’s lovers, but who was also infamously mischievous. Better yet, the anus is literally labeled “Salai.”
So either Salai drew these while Leonardo wasn’t looking just to annoy his boyfriend, or Leonardo himself put actual time and energy into drawing these. Either way, the human race is truly blessed to have made such a discovery.
There are dick drawings like the ones you see on desks in school in Leonardo da Vinci’s notebooks. Please cherish this information.

In the midst of exploring Renaissance Italy history for reasons, I have found a wonder.

theotherjax:

hideakiohno:

Casual reminder that in one of Leonardo da Vinci’s many notebooks containing innumerable artistic and scientific sketches and notes of incomprehensible important, there is a sketch of two penises with legs and tails walking towards a crudely drawn anus.

The sketch was most likely done by Leonardo’s apprentice Salai, who was not only very likely one of Leonardo’s lovers, but who was also infamously mischievous. Better yet, the anus is literally labeled “Salai.”

So either Salai drew these while Leonardo wasn’t looking just to annoy his boyfriend, or Leonardo himself put actual time and energy into drawing these. Either way, the human race is truly blessed to have made such a discovery.

There are dick drawings like the ones you see on desks in school in Leonardo da Vinci’s notebooks. Please cherish this information.

In the midst of exploring Renaissance Italy history for reasons, I have found a wonder.

tragedyseries:

It was nice to meet some of you at SDCC. This craft-project would have bee useful at times during that humid span of days. I recommend printing out on sturdy stock!

tragedyseries:

It was nice to meet some of you at SDCC. This craft-project would have bee useful at times during that humid span of days. I recommend printing out on sturdy stock!

cijithegeek:

youngbertreynolds:

Maybe put it on a canvas instead of someone’s property, and we can all be happy.

My father was a garment contractor in LA. In the late 80s, he owned the building where he had his factory. He thought it would be a cool idea to commission local graffiti artists, usually young Black and Latino men looking to stay out of trouble, to paint murals on his buildings. After all, he runs a garment design/manufacturing company, and creative signage is great advertising.
One day, he showed up to the building and the city just painted over the murals without permission or notice.
First, the city told him he couldn’t have graffiti art on HIS building because it brought down property value. After he complained, then they said: ok you can do this, but you need a permit. After he got the permit, then the city said: ok, but you can only use these artists.  Of course, these artists were all White graphic design students from USC, and of course they charged 3x more.
There is a prejudice against this type of art, and it’s racial.  Banksy vandalizes folks buildings all the time, and folks treat him like the Messiah. He ain’t doing nothing new that Black and Brown folks haven’t done for decades.

cijithegeek:

youngbertreynolds:

Maybe put it on a canvas instead of someone’s property, and we can all be happy.

My father was a garment contractor in LA. In the late 80s, he owned the building where he had his factory. He thought it would be a cool idea to commission local graffiti artists, usually young Black and Latino men looking to stay out of trouble, to paint murals on his buildings. After all, he runs a garment design/manufacturing company, and creative signage is great advertising.

One day, he showed up to the building and the city just painted over the murals without permission or notice.

First, the city told him he couldn’t have graffiti art on HIS building because it brought down property value. After he complained, then they said: ok you can do this, but you need a permit. After he got the permit, then the city said: ok, but you can only use these artists.  Of course, these artists were all White graphic design students from USC, and of course they charged 3x more.

There is a prejudice against this type of art, and it’s racial.  Banksy vandalizes folks buildings all the time, and folks treat him like the Messiah. He ain’t doing nothing new that Black and Brown folks haven’t done for decades.

I am finally moving to Brooklyn!

Needless to say, money is going to be tight, so if anyone wants some great art please let me know!

Other examples of my art can be found either at my art blog or in my art tag on my personal blog!

I am finally moving to Brooklyn!

Needless to say, money is going to be tight, so if anyone wants some great art please let me know!

Other examples of my art can be found either at my art blog or in my art tag on my personal blog!

archiemcphee:

These beautiful moths and butterflies look like they’re ready to flutter up and away, but they won’t be doing so because they’re wonderful textile sculptures painstakingly created by North Carolina-based artist Yumi Okita. She sews, embroiders and stitches all sorts of multi-colored fabrics to create these oversized insects, which measure nearly a foot wide. She also adds painted details along with feathers and artificial fur. With great care Okita has achieved an awesome balance between astonishing realism and fanciful invention.

Click here to view more of Yumi Okita’s gorgeous textile insect sculptures.

[via Colossal and Demilked]

tartapplesauce:

illustrate-her:

A message to you today from Artemisia Gentileschi, kick-arse 17th Century feminist artist.

Oh hell yes.  For those of you who don’t know (a) the story of Artemisia Gentileschi (b) the subject matter of her painting, let me give you a quick heads-up.
First, the topic of the picture is “Susanna and the Elders”.  It’s a story from the Book of Daniel, Old Testament, the Bible.
A beautiful young married woman, Susanna, is having a bath in her own garden.  She sends all her maids away for some privacy.  Two Elders (and these are supposed to be respectable older men, the pillars of society in both religion and secular leadership) are spying on her.  They threaten Susanna that, unless she agrees to have sex with them, they’ll spread a false story that she was meeting a young man on the sly.
Now, the point of the story is this: Susanna is a married woman.  If she’s accused of adultery, she will be sentenced to death.  The two elders know they can get away with this, because they’re respectable leaders of society and who is going to be believed: them or the woman?
Susanna refuses to be blackmailed into sex, and sure enough they carry out their threat.  Susanna is only saved when a young man named Daniel interrupts the trial, says that the two men should be questioned separately, and he cleverly picks out the flaws in their testimony to prove they are lying and she is innocent.
Now, for the artist: Artemisia Gentileschi was a 17th century Roman woman, the eldest child of a painter who, unusually, encouraged and trained his daughter to be an artist as well as his sons (and she was better than her brothers).
Her father was working with another painter whom he also hired to tutor Artemisia.  This guy raped her, but they continued to have a sexual relationship with the promise of marriage (this was because marriage was the only hope she had of keeping her reputation).  Well, being a sleazeball, he never followed through on the promise of marriage and so her father took him to court.
Artemisia also supported the charge of rape, and while maintaining her testimony that she had been a virgin before being seduced/raped, she was subjected to torture by thumbscrews - this was standard practice to make sure witnesses/plaintiffs were telling the truth, but of course, it was important that she was tortured to make sure she wasn’t lying about him because she was a jilted vindictive woman, but he wasn’t tortured to make sure he wasn’t lying about being a rapist.  Same old, same old, yes?
The point of this little history lesson?  From the second century B.C. (the setting of Susanna’s story) to the 17th century to today, men have tricked, lied, bullied and threatened women with death if they didn’t have sex with them; treated them as whores and sluts if they did have sex with them, and the whole of society was stacked in favour of the men and not the women.
It’s not “one mentally disturbed young man” that’s the problem.
It’s the whole bloody attitude of entitlement: that women exist only and mainly as sexual property for men.

tartapplesauce:

illustrate-her:

A message to you today from Artemisia Gentileschi, kick-arse 17th Century feminist artist.

Oh hell yes.  For those of you who don’t know (a) the story of Artemisia Gentileschi (b) the subject matter of her painting, let me give you a quick heads-up.

First, the topic of the picture is “Susanna and the Elders”.  It’s a story from the Book of Daniel, Old Testament, the Bible.

A beautiful young married woman, Susanna, is having a bath in her own garden.  She sends all her maids away for some privacy.  Two Elders (and these are supposed to be respectable older men, the pillars of society in both religion and secular leadership) are spying on her.  They threaten Susanna that, unless she agrees to have sex with them, they’ll spread a false story that she was meeting a young man on the sly.

Now, the point of the story is this: Susanna is a married woman.  If she’s accused of adultery, she will be sentenced to death.  The two elders know they can get away with this, because they’re respectable leaders of society and who is going to be believed: them or the woman?

Susanna refuses to be blackmailed into sex, and sure enough they carry out their threat.  Susanna is only saved when a young man named Daniel interrupts the trial, says that the two men should be questioned separately, and he cleverly picks out the flaws in their testimony to prove they are lying and she is innocent.

Now, for the artist: Artemisia Gentileschi was a 17th century Roman woman, the eldest child of a painter who, unusually, encouraged and trained his daughter to be an artist as well as his sons (and she was better than her brothers).

Her father was working with another painter whom he also hired to tutor Artemisia.  This guy raped her, but they continued to have a sexual relationship with the promise of marriage (this was because marriage was the only hope she had of keeping her reputation).  Well, being a sleazeball, he never followed through on the promise of marriage and so her father took him to court.

Artemisia also supported the charge of rape, and while maintaining her testimony that she had been a virgin before being seduced/raped, she was subjected to torture by thumbscrews - this was standard practice to make sure witnesses/plaintiffs were telling the truth, but of course, it was important that she was tortured to make sure she wasn’t lying about him because she was a jilted vindictive woman, but he wasn’t tortured to make sure he wasn’t lying about being a rapist.  Same old, same old, yes?

The point of this little history lesson?  From the second century B.C. (the setting of Susanna’s story) to the 17th century to today, men have tricked, lied, bullied and threatened women with death if they didn’t have sex with them; treated them as whores and sluts if they did have sex with them, and the whole of society was stacked in favour of the men and not the women.

It’s not “one mentally disturbed young man” that’s the problem.

It’s the whole bloody attitude of entitlement: that women exist only and mainly as sexual property for men.

artofthedarkages:

anglosaxonfragments:

mediumaevum:

Decoding Anglo-Saxon art

Rosie Weetch, curator and Craig Williams, illustrator, British Museum

Read the whole blog here: http://blog.britishmuseum.org/2014/05/28/decoding-anglo-saxon-art/

Anglo-Saxon metalworkers were like the Michelangelo of the 8th century!